Cut the notice period for families of deceased sheltered housing residents

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Bereaved families can face a bill for thousands of pounds as a result of this hurtful and unfair 28-day notice period.  

I wholeheartedly support the move to scrap the 28-day notice period enforced on the families of deceased residents of sheltered housing by local councils.

This issue has been brought to light by several families appealing to their local councils, and often getting the decisions overturned, but these are small minority of cases and only due to the pressure of petitions and support generated by the local media.

The 28-day notice period is an unfair ruling because the housing benefits often paid to the residents cease the day after the death, leaving the family to pay the accommodation costs out of their own pockets.

It is also inefficient, as it means that the accommodation stays empty for at least 28 days, when councils could give families two weeks to empty and clean the properties to be ready for occupation…a faster turnaround that is to everybody’s benefit.

It will be easy for the Department for Communities and Local Government to reduce the notice period, and as it will also benefit local councils, the Local Government Association should also lobby Whitehall to make this sensible change.    

Tags: sheltered housing local council

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